Mu’min and Muslim


Every Mumin is a Muslim but every Muslim is not necessarily a Mumin. By the term Mumin a person who has firm inner belief is meant and by the term Muslim we mean a submitter, i.e. someone who resigns His will to Allah, who agrees that there is Allah and He has given guidance to mankind. However he may not be practising those rules in his life, e.g. he is drinking alcohol, dating, earning by illegitimate means etc, but verbally says and knows all this is wrong. He merely surrenders. This is the first stage. But when a person becomes a Mumin or a convinced believer, then this is the stage where he moves from initial submission. He also starts acting on the rules and practices the laws of Allah in his life. He is a Muslim i.e. a submitter as well as a Mumin i.e. convinced believer and an actor. A Muslim who does not act on the rules is however on the first stage, and Imaan has not entered his heart. This will happen when he starts practising the rules.

This point is made evident by the Qur’an,

The bedouins say, “We have believed.” Say, “You have not [yet] believed; but say [instead], ‘We have submitted,’ for faith has not yet entered your hearts. And if you obey Allah and His Messenger, He will not deprive you from your deeds of anything. Indeed, Allah is Forgiving and Merciful.” 49:14

In this verse the distinction between state of Muslim and state of Mu’min is made clear. Merely saying “We have believed.” is not enough to qualify as a believer but simply qualifies one as a Submitter (Muslim). It is when one starts acting on the rules, i.e. shows obedience to Allah and His messenger that they qualify as a Mumin. All commandments in the Quran are addressed to Al Ladhina Amanoo i.e. ‘those who have believed’, because it is in this state that one actually puts in practice the rules they resign to.

This can be demonstrated through a worldly example. When a personal shows a willingness to the aims and objectives of an institution has made an application to join it, he is a submitter or a Muslim to that institution. At this point has has submitted an application to join which indicates his willingness, and agreement. Once he joins, and gets trained and practices the knowledge, he is a firm and convinced believer in the rules and skills that the institution imparts on him. His practice of the rules is proof oh his belief or imaan on the institutional rules. Thus he is now progressed to another level as a Mumin i.e. a firmly convinced believer of that institution, while also retaining his initial status as an applicant who had shown his willingness to submit to the institution. On the other hand a person who has made an application, got admission, but never learned or practices what was taught in the institute, can he be equal to the latter category? Unless he is obedient to the curriculum he is not qualified to be a believer. His increase in knowledge and practise will be proof of his conviction.

That is why a believer (Mumin) is always also a submitter (Muslim), but a submitter is not necessarily always a believer, as he may not have progressed forward as showed in Qur’an 49:13.

Islam (Submission) and Iman (inner belief) are two different things. The fact that people have submitted to the commands of Allah does not mean they have belief in Allah in their hearts. Their submission can be for a variety of reasons, could be out of fear, to make friends or allies, to be acceptable in society or to marry a girl. All this is outwardly. Imaan – however is entirely different and is concerned with the qalb (heart) of a person and is between man and God.

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